Fresenius Kabi to invest $250 million to expand Melrose Park site in Illinois, US

Building work will start next year at generic injectables plant and will be completed in 2026

Fresenius Kabi is to expand its Melrose Park site in Illinois, US

German firm Fresenius Kabi is to invest approximately $250 million over 10 years to expand its Melrose Park, IL site in the US.

The plant currently produces a range of generic, sterile injectable medicines.

The multi-stage, multi-year project at Melrose Park will start next year, with final project completion in 2026.

Fresenius Kabi's US headquarters is in Lake Zurich, Illinois and in total the firm employs more than 1,500 people in the state.

The company operates more than 70 manufacturing sites worldwide and the Melrose Park location will be one of its largest. Its global headquarters is in Bad Homburg, Germany.

The project will include new buildings for automated aseptic filling lines connected to the existing manufacturing site, expanded lyophilisation capabilities, formulation areas, as well as a dedicated warehouse.

An administration building with conference centre, laboratories, office space and a cafeteria, is also included in the expansion.

'Our goal is to expand our US manufacturing capabilities while ensuring continued compliance with increasing regulatory and quality requirements and improve production capacity and efficiency,' said Steven Nowicki, Senior Vice President of Global Operations for North America, Pharmaceuticals Division at Fresenius Kabi.

In addition to its Melrose Park locations, Fresenius Kabi has other plants in Illinois, including Bensenville, Skokie and Lake Zurich.

The company also has manufacturing sites in New York, North Carolina and Pennsylvania and employs more than 2,500 people in the US.

Earlier this year, Fresenius Kabi bought a pharmaceutical manufacturing plant in Wilson, NC from Becton, Dickinson.

The deal also included a small portfolio of drugs in ready to use prefilled glass syringes.

The firm said the acquisition would allow it to offer a broader range of speciality injectable medicines in vials, as well as ready to use presentations.