Translational asthma in vivo models

Charles River has developed models that allow comparisons of compounds and mechanisms between mild-moderate allergic asthma and severe asthma

The recent acquisition of Argenta has expanded Charles River's entire respiratory and fibrosis model portfolio significantly. Asthma remains a growing problem and burden on society.

Current therapies, based around inhaled steroids and bronchodilators, have utility in treating and controlling the symptoms in mild-moderate asthmatics. However, a substantial number of asthmatics, estimated to be 10-15% of the asthmatic population, are not well treated by such standard of care therapies. This population of severe asthmatics has a major impact on health economics and respiratory care facilities, with some estimates suggesting that they consume 90% of the total asthma care costs. This is a major cost burden on health care providers, and the clinical unmet need is an area of growth for new therapies.

Severe asthmatics differ from mild-moderate asthmatics in that they require very high doses of steroid therapy (both oral and inhaled) and are often characterised as having a mixed inflammatory cell lung response (eosinophils and neutrophils) compared to  the eosinphilic response of mild-moderate asthmatics.

Charles River has developed models that allow comparisons of compounds and mechanisms between mild-moderate allergic asthma and severe asthma, with real translational potential to asthma in humans. Mice are sensitised to common allergens such as house dust mite (HDM) and when their lungs are challenged with HDM they generate a steroid-sensitive eosinophilic response, akin to mild-moderate asthma in humans, with similar profiles of inflammatory mediators.

For the severe asthma model, mice are sensitised to HDM mixed with Complete Freunds Adjuvant (CFA) and when their lungs are challenged with HDM they generate a steroid insensitive neutrophilic and eosinophilic response, similar to that seen in severe asthma in humans, again with similar profiles of inflammatory mediators.

Testing compounds in this pair of models allows the full potential of mechanisms to be explored; the company believes this is a unique offering within the CRO industry.

To learn more about this translational asthma model please join us for our webinar on September 25. Click here to register.

Severe Asthma: A Translational In Vivo Model

 

Asthma is a common, chronic inflammatory disease that affects more than 300 million individuals worldwide. The severe asthma sub-group is characterised as being difficult to control by inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), and these patients are at high risk of frequent severe exacerbations and account for a significant proportion of asthma-related health care costs. Relevant translational models are therefore essential to determine the effectiveness of novel potential therapeutics for different asthmatic sub-groups.

 

This webinar will showcase translational preclinical models characterising some of the different asthma phenotypes, especially severe asthma. Additionally, the webinar will focus on the responsiveness of these models to both inhaled and oral steroids in order to benchmark how novel therapeutics might perform in the clinic.

 

Webinar Presenter: Dr Alan Young, Respiratory Business Development Manager, Charles River Discovery Services

When: Thursday, September 25, 2014, 11:00am - 12:00pm Eastern Daylight Time

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