VSParticle unveils Nanoparticle Generator

The Dutch tech company has developed a device that can create and print materials with quantum properties

Photo credit: VSParticle

VSParticle, a Dutch nanotechnology company, has announced the launch of its Nanoparticle Generator. With the push of a button, the groundbreaking device and its technology make possible the development of completely new materials, products and processes in a variety of industries with application in the semiconductors, batteries and sensors.

The Nanoparticle Generator works on a scale of zero to 20 nanometers (sizes that competing solutions cannot produce) and can create, and also print, materials with quantum properties.

The device enables users to play with the possibilities and to invent entirely new materials or discover new applications. Examples include phone sensors that measure air quality, tiny solar panels for device charging, phone batteries that never run out or even, the enabling of hydrogen cars.

Photo credit: VSParticle

“We are extremely enthusiastic about the launch of our technology. It signals a revolution in the field of nanotech and material innovation within numerous industries and also plays a role in helping the circular economy succeed," said Aaike van Vugt, VSParticle CEO.

Dutch roots

VS Particle was spun-out of TU Delft university by professor Andreas Schmidt-Ott, scientist Tobias Pfeiffer and former student, Van Vugt in 2014.

The entrepreneurs spent the first two years, improving and simplifying the technology to make it easy enough to get results with the push of a button. Many believe the potential for VS Particle's technology is enormous.

"The technology that VS Particle has developed has the potential to literally change the world," said Keesjan Cordia, investor with Invaco, which seed funded the company in 2017.

Cordia continued: "Every investor is looking for that special company that can actually have a real impact. VSParticle is that company."

VSParticle said its 3D Nanoprinter is due for launch in early 2019 and will make the printing of materials with nanoparticle properties just as simple and effective.

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